Potty Training a Pygmy

Monday, December 21, 2009

When you think house pet, for most people, pygmy goat normally isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. However, if it is the first thing that comes to your mind, you’ll be happy to know that eHow.com offers instructions on how to teach your house goat not to piddle in said house. Having provided this useful information, Naimhe has some suggestions and comments of her own.

Goats have hooves. It would seem obvious but may be necessary to mention that hooves are hard on wood floors, carpeting, furniture, countertops, and many other surfaces normally found within homes. Your adorable 5 lb baby is going to grow into a still rather adorable 50 lb goat and will behave like a goat. For goat behavior, see the rest of this site. To summarize, that sweet little thing is going to greet you one day from the top of the counter, surrounded by pelleted poop, eating your curtains. Be aware.

Don’t teach or allow your house goat to jump into your lap or onto your shoulders as a baby. As mentioned earlier, it will become a much larger baby given time and 50 lbs of hooved love isn’t as cute jumping on your back as that little ball of fluff was.

Over years of watching goats, both the outdoor and indoor kind, Naimhe believes that goats aren’t really aware of when they are pooping. They just walk about dropping those little pellets as they go. You will never train a goat to poop where you want it to so save yourself the aggravation and don’t try. She also disagrees that the pellets are stinky, however the urine can be so if you do plan to keep your goat in the house, plan accordingly.

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One Response to “Potty Training a Pygmy”

  1. kaz

    Baaaaaaa cheers for the advice x

    #30067

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All Things Goat was created by Naimhe Jeanne (Nee-Vah Jeen,) of Illinois, and Martha Ann, of Vermont, who believe in the humane treatment of goats whether they are pets or raised for milk, meat or fiber. Through news, profiles, recipes and editorials, All Things Goat illustrates how our caprine friends improve the quality of life for many worldwide. Our All Things Goat intern is Lela Perez, of Killeen, Texas.

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